Abstract

There is a significant medical need for tough biodegradable polymer adhesives that can adapt to or recover from various mechanical deformations while remaining strongly attached to the underlying tissue. We approached this problem by using a polymer poly(glycerol-co-sebacate acrylate) and modifying the surface to mimic the nanotopography of gecko feet, which allows attachment to vertical surfaces. Translation of existing gecko-inspired adhesives for medical applications is complex, as multiple parameters must be optimized, including: biocompatibility, biodegradation, strong adhesive tissue bonding, as well as compliance and conformability to tissue surfaces. Ideally these adhesives would also have the ability to deliver drugs or growth factors to promote healing. As a first demonstration, we have created a gecko-inspired tissue adhesive from a biocompatible and biodegradable elastomer combined with a thin tissue-reactive biocompatible surface coating. Tissue adhesion was optimized by varying dimensions of the nanoscale pillars, including the ratio of tip diameter to pitch and the ratio of tip diameter to base diameter. Coating these nanomolded pillars of biodegradable elastomers with a thin layer of oxidized dextran significantly increased the interfacial adhesion strength on porcine intestine tissue in vitro and in the rat abdominal subfascial in vivo environment. This gecko-inspired medical adhesive may have potential applications for sealing wounds and for replacement or augmentation of sutures or staples.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

We thank Professor Lisa Freed for use of her ELF 3200 mechanical tester. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant DE013023 and National Science Foundation Grant NIRT 0609182. This work was also supported by the Materials Research Science and Engineering Program of the National Science Foundation under award number DMR 02-1328 and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology–Portugal (focus in bioengineering). C.J.B. was supported by a Charles Stark Draper Laboratory Fellowship.

Supporting Information

Adobe PDF - 12117Fig5.pdf
Adobe PDF - 12117Fig5.pdf
Adobe PDF - 12117Fig6.pdf
Adobe PDF - 12117Fig6.pdf

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Information & Authors

Information

Published in

Go to Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Go to Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vol. 105 | No. 7
February 19, 2008
PubMed: 18287082

Classifications

Submission history

Received: November 30, 2007
Published online: February 19, 2008
Published in issue: February 19, 2008

Keywords

  1. chemical cross-link
  2. medical adhesive
  3. nanotopography
  4. surgical suture

Acknowledgments

We thank Professor Lisa Freed for use of her ELF 3200 mechanical tester. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant DE013023 and National Science Foundation Grant NIRT 0609182. This work was also supported by the Materials Research Science and Engineering Program of the National Science Foundation under award number DMR 02-1328 and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology–Portugal (focus in bioengineering). C.J.B. was supported by a Charles Stark Draper Laboratory Fellowship.

Notes

This article contains supporting information online at www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/0712117105/DC1.

Authors

Affiliations

Alborz Mahdavi
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Lino Ferreira
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Center of Neurosciences and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, and Biocant Biotechnology Innovation Center, 3060-197 Cantanhede, Portugal;
Cathryn Sundback
Center for Regenerative Medicine and
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;
Jason W. Nichol
Harvard–Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health Science and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139;
Edwin P. Chan
Harvard–Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health Science and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139;
David J. D. Carter
The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Cambridge, MA 02139-3563;
Chris J. Bettinger
Harvard–Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health Science and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139;
Siamrut Patanavanich
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Loice Chignozha
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Eli Ben-Joseph
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Alex Galakatos
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Howard Pryor
Center for Regenerative Medicine and
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;
Irina Pomerantseva
Center for Regenerative Medicine and
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;
Peter T. Masiakos
Departments of **Pediatric Surgery and
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;
William Faquin
Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114;
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;
Andreas Zumbuehl
Biozentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50/70, 4056 Basel, Switzerland; and
Seungpyo Hong
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Jeffrey Borenstein
The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Cambridge, MA 02139-3563;
Joseph Vacanti
Center for Regenerative Medicine and
Departments of **Pediatric Surgery and
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307;
Harvard–Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health Science and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139;
Jeffrey M. Karp§§ [email protected]
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;
Health Sciences and Technology, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115

Notes

§§
To whom correspondence may be addressed. E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected]
Contributed by Robert Langer, December 26, 2007
Author contributions: A.M. and L.F. contributed equally to this work; A.M., L.F., C.S., J.W.N., D.J.D.C., C.J.B., A.Z., S.H., J.B., J.V., R.L., and J.M.K. designed research; A.M., L.F., C.S., J.W.N., D.J.D.C., S.P., L.C., E.B.J., A.G., H.P., I.P., and P.T.M. performed research; A.M., L.F., C.S., J.W.N., E.P.C., D.J.D.C., W.F., and J.M.K. analyzed data; and A.M., L.F., C.S., E.P.C., R.L., and J.M.K. wrote the paper.

Competing Interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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    A biodegradable and biocompatible gecko-inspired tissue adhesive
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    • Vol. 105
    • No. 7
    • pp. 2255-2751

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