Highly sensitive and selective odorant sensor using living cells expressing insect olfactory receptors

Edited by Katepalli R. Sreenivasan, New York University, New York, NY, and approved July 20, 2010 (received for review March 31, 2010)
August 23, 2010
107 (35) 15340-15344

Abstract

This paper describes a highly sensitive and selective chemical sensor using living cells (Xenopus laevis oocytes) within a portable fluidic device. We constructed an odorant sensor whose sensitivity is a few parts per billion in solution and can simultaneously distinguish different types of chemicals that have only a slight difference in double bond isomerism or functional group such as ─OH, ─CHO and ─C(═O)─. We developed a semiautomatic method to install cells to the fluidic device and achieved stable and reproducible odorant sensing. In addition, we found that the sensor worked for multiple-target chemicals and can be integrated with a robotic system without any noise reduction systems. Our developed sensor is compact and easy to replace in the system. We believe that the sensor can potentially be incorporated into a portable system for monitoring environmental and physical conditions.

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Acknowledgments.

The authors thank Prof. I. Shimoyama and his colleagues at Information and Robot Technology Research Initiative of the University of Tokyo for helpful discussions, and Prof. M. Asashima of the University of Tokyo for kindly providing the Xenopus laevis oocytes. We also appreciate the generous support by Y. Tanaka of Tecella, LLC for customization of the multichannel amplifier and the substantial contribution by H. Ishihara, S. Takaya, and S. Sugimoto of the University of Tokyo for the robot integration. This work was partly supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization and by Tokyo Electron Ltd.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published in

Go to Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vol. 107 | No. 35
August 31, 2010
PubMed: 20798064

Classifications

Submission history

Published online: August 23, 2010
Published in issue: August 31, 2010

Keywords

  1. fluidic channel
  2. odorant receptor
  3. robot
  4. Xenopus oocyte

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Prof. I. Shimoyama and his colleagues at Information and Robot Technology Research Initiative of the University of Tokyo for helpful discussions, and Prof. M. Asashima of the University of Tokyo for kindly providing the Xenopus laevis oocytes. We also appreciate the generous support by Y. Tanaka of Tecella, LLC for customization of the multichannel amplifier and the substantial contribution by H. Ishihara, S. Takaya, and S. Sugimoto of the University of Tokyo for the robot integration. This work was partly supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization and by Tokyo Electron Ltd.

Notes

This article is a PNAS Direct Submission.

Authors

Affiliations

Nobuo Misawa1
Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan;
Life Bio Electro-mechanical Autonomous Nano Systems (Life BEANS) Center, The BEANS Project, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan; and
Hidefumi Mitsuno1
Life Bio Electro-mechanical Autonomous Nano Systems (Life BEANS) Center, The BEANS Project, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan; and
Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904, Japan
Ryohei Kanzaki
Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904, Japan
Shoji Takeuchi2 [email protected]
Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan;
Life Bio Electro-mechanical Autonomous Nano Systems (Life BEANS) Center, The BEANS Project, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan; and

Notes

2
To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: [email protected].
Author contributions: N.M., H.M., R.K., and S.T. designed research; N.M. and H.M. performed research; N.M. and H.M. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; N.M., H.M., R.K., and S.T. analyzed data; and N.M., H.M., R.K., and S.T. wrote the paper.
1
N.M. and H.M. contributed equally to this work.

Competing Interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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    Highly sensitive and selective odorant sensor using living cells expressing insect olfactory receptors
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    • Vol. 107
    • No. 35
    • pp. 15307-15658

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