Table 2.

Correlations between attractiveness and measures*

Women: Study 2, n = 156
Men: Study 2, n = 125
Men: Study 1, n = 62
Zero orderβ (c/str-d)Zero-orderβ (c/str-d)Zero-orderβ (c/lifting-a)β (c/percep-b)
Proneness to anger0.23 (P = 0.002)0.22 (P = 0.003)0.14 (P = 0.06)0.04 (P = 0.34)0.39 (P = 0.001)0.32 (P = 0.004)0.25 (P = 0.028)
History of fighting0.03 (P = 0.34)0.03 (P = 0.37)0.08 (P = 0.17)−0.04 (P = 0.32)0.25 (P = 0.027)0.14 (P = 0.11)0.05 (P = 0.35)
Utility of personal aggression0.18 (P = 0.014)0.17 (P = 0.02)0.12 (P = 0.09)0.01 (P = 0.46)0.26 (P = 0.02)0.19 (P = 0.06)0.15 (P = 0.13)
Utility of political aggression0.15 (P = 0.033)0.15 (P = 0.04)−0.03 (P = 0.37)−0.09 (P = 0.18)0.28 (P = 0.013)0.23 (P = 0.035)0.20 (P = 0.08)
Entitlement0.31 (P = 0.00008)0.30 (P = 0.0001)0.26 (P = 0.002)0.18 (P = 0.025)
Success in conflict0.22 (P = 0.003)0.22 (P = 0.003)0.28 (P = 0.0008)0.23 (P = 0.007)
Rumination0.05 (P = 0.26)0.05 (P = 0.26)−0.02 (P = 0.40)−0.04 (P = 0.33)0.09 (P = 0.25)0.09 (P = 0.25)0.02 (P = 0.44)
  • *βs are the effect sizes for attractiveness in a regression controlling for strength measures (indicated by letter, see Table 1). P values are one-tailed (all were directional predictions except for rumination).